Cosmetic Animal Testing… The Ugly Behind Beauty

Photo taken from Google Images

Eyeliner, mascara, lip gloss and hairspray are essentials to many women when starting their day. When putting on  mascara it feels great to know it’s a safe product and you’re not going to go blind because of it. But next time you’re beautifying your face, look at the cosmetics you use, was the product animal tested? Now think of the animals who actually have gone blind from of it.

Although many agree that products should be tested for the safety of humans, no law requires that cosmetics and household products be tested on animals. Every year millions of animals are poisoned, burned, blinded and killed in barbaric animal testing methods. Even though the results of animal tests are often unreliable or not applicable to humans, rats, mice, guinea pigs, rabbits, and other animals are forced to swallow or inhale massive quantities of a test substance or endure the pain of a chemical eating away at their sensitive eyes and skin.

Watch this video “Testing 1,2,3” for a better picture of what is really going on.

Although the demand for products not tested on animals is increasing, some companies such as SC Johnson, Johnson and Johnson and Unilever are still using animal testing because they have done it for so long and simply do not have the vision to try new and better ways.

Many alternatives to animal testing are available today. Instead of measuring how long it takes a chemical to burn away the cornea of a rabbit’s eye, manufacturers can now drop that chemical onto donated human corneas. Other effective and sophisticated alternatives like Episkin®, use artificial human skin that can replace some animal tests in a fraction of the time and cost. Technologies like these are being continually developed.These technologies can give a better idea of what the products can do to humans and not animals.

How you can help:

To help stop this unnecessary animal cruelty, all you need to do is be a more conscious consumer. Next time you are shopping for cosmetics including any personal-care products such as hairspray, shampoo and even deodorant, check  the labels to see if the product is animal tested.Sometimes it can be hard to tell what products are cruelty-free because of all of the different ways it can be conveyed on the package. The main standard suggested is the Leaping Bunny, which was put out by the Coalition for Consumer Information on Cosmetics’ (CCIC). The Leaping Bunny Program administers a cruelty-free standard and the internationally recognized Leaping Bunny Logo for companies producing cosmetic, personal care, and household products.

PETA has also compiled a list of companies who do not test. You can check this list to see if the products you use made the list or search the list for your next cruelty-free purchase.

What do you think about animal testing? Do you plan on ditching any of your products for  cruelty-free ones?